Safe Surf Rated Back To Home Page Family Friendly Site
About
Bradford
  HIV/AIDS
Articles
  Alternative
Therapies
  HIV/AIDS
Videos
  HIV/AIDS
Links
  HIV/AIDS
News

Introduction:
Positively Positive
- Living with HIV
  Out
About
HIV
  Resume/
Curriculum Vitae:
HIV / AIDS Involvements
  Biography   HIV/AIDS
News Archive
HIV/AIDS News Bradford McIntyre
   



Plenary speakers address challenges in the delivery of sustained antiretroviral therapy in developing countries, call for social scientists to take their place at the HIV/AIDS policy- making table, and stress the need for a long-term response to AIDS

Tuesday,19 July, 2011 (Rome, Italy) - Researchers speaking in the second plenary session of the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) ) have today provided insights into the future direction of HIV/AIDS policy making and alerted delegates to the challenges that developing countries continue to face in the delivery of large- scale antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage.

The presentations reflect the breadth of expertise among the more than 5,000 researchers, clinicians and community leaders attending the conference, which runs from 17-20 July in Rome.

"The AIDS response up until now has led to unprecedented mobilization of populations and significant progress in terms of prevention and treatment," said IAS 2011 International Chair and IAS President Elly Katabira. "However, given the projections we have made of infections over the next decade, together with the growing number of people living longer with HIV, it makes perfect sense to discuss whether a remodeling or fine-tuning of that response might more effectively meet the new challenges that lie ahead."

"Discussion around the future direction of HIV/AIDS policy must begin to give a far greater voice to the social sciences," said Stefano Vella, IAS 2011 Local Co-Chair and Research Director at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS).  "The social and political sciences are a vital element in helping us to improve prevention efforts, especially in developing countries where major challenges remain in the effective roll-out of ART."

The Social Barriers to Effective HIV Prevention
In her plenary remarks, Susan Kippax (Australia), Emeritus Professor at the Social Policy Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, suggested that in understanding HIV prevention efforts, people's behaviours cannot be separated from their social, cultural and political structures, and the biomedical cannot be distinguished from the non-biomedical. Kippax argued that there is a need for social scientists to be at the table when it comes to discussing what many experts currently consider to be the greatest challenge to HIV/AIDS policy making - prevention.

Irrespective of whether prevention programmes or interventions advocate the use of condoms, clean needles and syringes, microbicides, pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis, or treatment as prevention - all prevention requires that people change their social practices: changes which cannot be effectively sustained unless they are supported by broader social transformation.

A decade after the first antiretroviral therapy initiatives were initiated in developing countries, the number of HIV-infected individuals receiving ART has significantly increased. Recent data estimate that six million HIV-infected patients started ART and four and a half million of them (75 per cent) live in sub-Saharan Africa, and significant results have been obtained in decreasing mortality and morbidity.

Seven areas were identified as challenging in the ongoing delivery of ART in developing countries:

 

  • financing the sustainability of ART-programmes, particularly in the context of the current adverse economic climate and with insufficient contributions from national governments;
  • the high incidence of mortality and severe mortality during the first year following ART-initiation;
  • the adaptation of programmes, physicians, countries and partners to the WHO 2010 revised guidelines for adults and adolescents;
  • an increasing number of HIV-infected patients failing first-line treatment: the cost of second line treatment is four to five times higher than first line regimes. It is challenging for countries and partners to afford second line treatment, and difficult for physicians to detect first-line failure early enough;
  • detectingfirst-line treatment failure earlier and prescribing an effective and safe second line regimen in light of the expense of the latter;
  • management, diagnosis and treatment of side effects; 
  • retention of patients: data for cohorts studies show that 25%-30% of HIV patients starting treatment are lost to follow up after 12-24 months;
  • socio-political instability and humanitarian crisis and natural disasters

AIDS: The Need for a Long-term Response
Peter Piot (Belgium), Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, concluded the plenary session by reflecting that given the enormous mortality and human suffering caused by the AIDS epidemic, the nature of the global response to the AIDS epidemic has been framed as an emergency. Yet the ultimate duration of the emergency has rarely been discussed.

In spite of a recent decline in interest and funding for AIDS, UN member states recently adopted a "Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS: intensifying our efforts to eliminate HIV/AIDS" with ambitious goals for the next five years. Projections from aids2031 and UNAIDS estimate that over the coming two decades, there may still be one to one and a half million new infections and one million deaths annually, with resources required to curb infections well in excess of currently available funds.

The combination of these developments, as well as the longer life expectancy of many people infected with HIV, provides a compelling argument for the need for a long term view on the AIDS response. In addition, resource constraints dictate that effective investments leading to the best possible outcomes in both the short and long term are necessary, and right now.

ENDS

Online Coverage of IAS 2011 at www.ias2011.org

The online Programme-at-a-Glance, available through the website, includes links to abstracts, as well as session slides with audio and speeches (all abstract findings are embargoed until date and time of delivery at the conference). Additional online programming is provided by IAS 2011’s two official online partners: Clinical Care Options and NAM. Reporters and others can also follow key developments on the IAS 2011 blog at http://blog.ias2011.org or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ias2011.

About the IAS 2011 Organizers
IAS: The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, which is currently being held in Rome, Italy.

www.iasociety.org | www.facebook.com/iasociety | Follow us on Twitter @iasociety

ISS: The IIstituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) is the leading technical and scientific body of the Italian National Health Service. Its activities include research, clinical trials, and control and training in public health. It also serves as a major national clearing-house for technical and scientific information on public health issues. Among other things, the Institute conducts scientific research in a wide variety of fields, from cutting-edge molecular and genetic research, to population-based studies of risk factors for disease and disability, to Global Health research.


Onsite Media Centre Landline No. +39 0680241 756*
*For international calls to Italy, please note that the preliminary 0 in the area codes of land lines must be included

 

 

 

Name

Email

Mobile

International media:

Lindsey Rodger

Michael Kessler

 

lindsey.rodger@iasociety.org

mkessler@ya.com

 

 

+39 348 686 8417

Italian media:

Andrea Tomasini

 

tomasini39@hotmail.com

 

+39 329 263 4619


"Reproduced with permission - International AIDS Society"

International AIDS Society
www.iasociety.org



Scienza e societÓ alleate per articolare un'efficace risposta all'HIV/AIDS. Accesso allargato e durevole alle terapie antiretrovirali nei Paesi in via di sviluppo; coinvolgimento diretto degli esperti di scienze sociali nella messa a punto di politiche pubbliche: questi l'auspicio espresso dai relatori della sessione plenaria svoltasi oggi al congresso IAS 2011 di Roma

Martedý 19 Luglio 2011 (Roma, Italia) - Nella sessione plenaria di oggi alla VI Conferenza su Patogenesi, Trattamento e Prevenzione dell'HIV (IAS 2011) Ŕ stato fatto il punto sulla situazione attuale dell'epidemia definendo su questa base la proiezione delle tendenze in atto per definire politiche efficaci di lotta contro l'HIV/AIDS: tutti i relatori di oggi hanno richiamato all'attenzione dei partecipanti le sfide che i Paesi in via di sviluppo continuano ad affrontare per riuscire ad ottenere una distribuzione su larga scala della terapia antiretrovirale (ART).

"Fino ad oggi la risposta all'AIDS ha portato a una mobilitazione senza precedenti e a significativi progressi in termini di prevenzione e trattamento", ha dichiarato Elly Katabira, chairman dell'IAS 2011 e presidente dell'IAS. "Tuttavia, le proiezioni sui contagi per il prossimo decennio e il crescente numero di persone che vivono pi¨ a lungo con l'HIV suggeriscono la necessitÓ di valutare se rimodellare o perfezionare questo tipo di azioni possa fornire una risposta pi¨ efficace alle nuove sfide che abbiamo di fronte."

"Il dibattito sul futuro delle politiche sull'HIV/AIDS deve garantire uno ruolo più ampio alle scienze sociali", ha dichiarato Stefano Vella, Co-Presidente di IAS 2011Locale e direttore del dipartimento del farmaco all' Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS). "Le scienze sociali sono un elemento cruciale per migliorare l'efficacia della prevenzione, in particolare nei Paesi in via di sviluppo, nei quali sfide significative restano da affrontare per un efficace diffusione dell'ART"

Le Barriere Sociali che impediscono un'efficace prevenzione dell'HIV
Nel suo intervento in sessione plenaria, Susan Kippax, professore emerito presso Social Policy Research Centre della University of New South Wales di Sydney, ha ricordato come per poter definire l'impegno sul fronte della prevenzione dell'HIV, i comportamenti delle persone non possano essere separati dalle strutture sociali, culturali e politiche di appartenenza, e che gli aspetti biomedici non debbano essere separati dalle altre componenti in gico. La Kippax ha sostenuto la necessitÓ che gli esperti di scienze sociali partecipino alla discussione su quella che molti al momento considerano la pi¨ grande sfida per le politiche sull'HIV/AIDS: la prevenzione.

Indipendentemente dal fatto che i programmi o gli interventi di prevenzione insistano o meno sull'uso di preservativi, iniziative per lo scambio di siringhe, microbicidi, profilassi pre- o post-esposizione, o sulle terapie precoci per prevenire il contagio, ogni tipo di prevenzione necessita che le persone cambino le proprie abitudini sociali; cambiamenti che per poter essere messi in atto e sostenuti non possono essere demandati alla sola buona volontÓ dei singoli: necessitano del sostegno di una pi¨ ampia trasformazione sociale.

Sfide della Terapia Antiretrovirale (ART) nei Paesi in via di Sviluppo
Serge Eholié  Professore di Malattie Tropicali e Infettive presso la Scuola Medica della University of Abidjan, nella sua relazione si è concentrato sulle sfide da accogliere per rendere davvero operativo ed estensivo l'accesso alle terapie antiretrovirali nei Paesi in via di sviluppo.

Un decennio dopo le prime iniziative per introdurre e diffondere delle terapie antiretrovirali, il numero degli individui che ricevono la ART Ŕ aumentato significativamente. Secondo una recente stima, sei milioni di persone con HIV/AIDS hanno iniziato l'ART - quattro e mezzo di loro (il 75%) vivono nell'Africa sub-Sahariana: l'esito di questo accesso allargato Ŕ stato una significativa diminuzione della mortalitÓ e della virulenza.

Di seguito le aree chiave da affrontare per una strategia efficace di accesso e distribuzione della ART nei paesi in via si sviluppo:

  • finanziare la sostenibilità dei Programmi sull'ART, in particolare nel contesto del recessione economica in atto caratterizzata da insufficienti contributi dei governi nazionali;
  • l'alta incidenza e la gravità della mortalità durante il primo anno dopo l'inizio della somministrazione dell'ART;
  • l'adattamento dei programmi, dei medici e degli enti partecipanti alle nuove linee-guida terapeutiche dell'Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità;
  • il crescente numero di pazienti che hanno risultati negativi con la terapia di prima linea, tenendo conto che il costo della terapia di seconda linea è da quattro a cinque volte più alto. È una sfida per i Paesi e gli enti partecipanti potersi permettere una terapia con farmaci di seconda linea ed è difficile, in quei contesti sanitari, per i medici scoprire abbastanza precocemente l'inefficacia del trattamento di prima linea;
  • scoprire l'inefficacia della terapia first-line prima e prescrivere un efficace e sicuro regime di seconda linea alla luce del maggior costo di quest'ultimo;
  • management, diagnosi e terapia degli effetti collaterali;
  • continuità di assistenza clinico-terapeutica dei pazienti: i dati tratti da studi di coorte mostrano che il 25-30% dei pazienti che iniziano le terapie vengono persi al follow-up, dopo 12-24 mesi;
  • l'instabilità socio-politica, le crisi umanitarie e i disastri naturali.

AIDS: la necessitÓ di una risposta a lungo termine
Peter Piot (Belgio), direttore della London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, ha chiuso la sessione plenaria riflettendo sul fatto che, data l'enorme mortalitÓ e sofferenza causata dall'epidemia di AIDS, la natura della risposta globale all'AIDS Ŕ stata improntata e pensata come un'emergenza. Tuttavia, la durata effettiva di quest'emergenza non Ŕ quasi mai stata discussa.

Nonostante il recente declino di interesse e la diminuzione di fondi per la lotta all'AIDS, gli Stati membri delle Nazioni Unite hanno recentemente adottato un documento -"Dichiarazione Politica sull'HIV/AIDS: intensificare i nostri impegni per eliminare l'HIV/AIDS" - con obiettivi ambiziosi per i prossimi cinque anni. Le proiezioni di aids2031 e UNAIDS stimano che, nel corso dei prossimi due decenni, ci potranno essere da un milione a un milione e mezzo di nuovi contagi e un milione di morti all'anno, con una necessitÓ di risorse per tenere a freno i contagi decisamente maggiore rispetto alla attuale disponibilitÓ di fondi.

Gli esiti combinati di questi trend, cui si aggiunge la pi¨ lunga aspettativa di vita di molte persone con HIV/AIDS, forniscono una motivazione convincente del bisogno di articolare una strategia a lungo-termine di pi¨ ampio respiro per rispondere efficacemente alle sfide poste dall'AIDS. Inoltre, le limitazioni nelle risorse impongono come necessari e immediati efficaci investimenti, che portino ai risultati migliori possibili a breve e lungo termine.

Riferimenti

Online Coverage of IAS 2011 at www.ias2011.org

The online Programme-at-a-Glance, available through the website, includes links to abstracts, as well as session slides with audio and speeches (all abstract findings are embargoed until date and time of delivery at the conference). Additional online programming is provided by IAS 2011’s two official online partners: Clinical Care Options and NAM. Reporters and others can also follow key developments on the IAS 2011 blog at http://blog.ias2011.org or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ias2011.

About the IAS 2011 Organizers
IAS: The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, which is currently being held in Rome, Italy.

www.iasociety.org | www.facebook.com/iasociety | Follow us on Twitter @iasociety

ISS: The Istituto Superiore di SanitÓ (ISS) is the leading technical and scientific body of the Italian National Health Service. Its activities include research, clinical trials, and control and training in public health. It also serves as a major national clearing-house for technical and scientific information on public health issues. Among other things, the Institute conducts scientific research in a wide variety of fields, from cutting-edge molecular and genetic research, to population-based studies of risk factors for disease and disability, to Global Health research.

Onsite Media Centre Landline No. +39 0680241 756*
*For international calls to Italy, please note that the preliminary 0 in the area codes of land lines must be included

 

 

 

Name

Email

Mobile

International media:

Lindsey Rodger

Michael Kessler

 

lindsey.rodger@iasociety.org

mkessler@ya.com

 

 

+39 348 686 8417

Italian media:

Andrea Tomasini

 

tomasini39@hotmail.com

 

+39 329 263 4619



"Reproduced with permission - International AIDS Society"

International AIDS Society
www.iasociety.org


...positive attitudes are not simply 'moods'

Site Map

Contact Bradford McIntyre.

Web Design by Trevor Uksik

Copyright © 2003-2017 Bradford McIntyre. All rights reserved.

DESIGNED TO CREATE HIV & AIDS AWARENESS