Safe Surf Rated Back To Home Page Family Friendly Site
About
Bradford
  HIV/AIDS
Articles
  Alternative
Therapies
  HIV/AIDS
Videos
  HIV/AIDS
Links
  HIV/AIDS
News

Introduction:
Positively Positive
- Living with HIV
  Out
About
HIV
  Resume/
Curriculum Vitae:
HIV / AIDS Involvements
  Biography   HIV/AIDS
News Archive
HIV/AIDS News Bradford McIntyre
   



Study Examines Incident Hepatitis C Infection in HIV-Infected Men

February 1, 2011- Hepatitis C is a leading cause of illness and death for individuals infected with both HIV and hepatitis C.  Recent reports from around the world demonstrate that hepatitis C is emerging as a sexually transmitted infection among HIV-infected men who do not inject drugs.  However, many HIV-infected men do not receive continued screening for hepatitis C throughout their HIV care.  Hepatitis C symptoms often do not manifest themselves until the later stages of the illness, so people are not as likely to know that they have become infected and hence need further testing and treatment.  Researchers examined the role of later acquisition of hepatitis C in HIV patients in a new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases , which is currently available online .

In the study, 1,800 HIV-infected men had an initial negative hepatitis C blood test result, with at least one subsequent test. At the time of their initial negative hepatitis C results, 94 percent were receiving antiretroviral therapy for HIV and 6 percent reported current or prior injection drug use.

Ultimately, 36 patients were subsequently diagnosed with hepatitis C. Of those, 25 percent reported an injection drug use history, although 75 percent reported no current or previous injection drug use.

"Screening HIV-infected patients for hepatitis C only once upon entry into HIV care is not sufficient," according to study author Lynn E. Taylor, MD, of Brown University in Providence, R. I. "The standard of care needs to change. HIV-infected persons should have access to ongoing screening for hepatitis C. Doctors and patients may not be aware of or freely discuss all risk behaviors that may lead to hepatitis C infection. These behaviors are often stigmatized. Patients may not feel comfortable discussing these risk factors nor may they be aware of all the ways in which hepatitis C may be transmitted via blood."

###

Founded in 1904, The Journal of Infectious Diseases is the premier publication in the Western Hemisphere for original research on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases; on the microbes that cause them; and on disorders of host immune mechanisms. Articles in JID include research results from microbiology, immunology, epidemiology, and related disciplines. JID is published under the auspices of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). Based in Arlington, Va., IDSA is a professional society representing more than 9,000 physicians and scientists who specialize in infectious diseases. For more information, visit www.idsociety.org.


CONTACT:
John Heys
jheys@idsociety.org
703-299-0412


...positive attitudes are not simply 'moods'

Site Map

Contact Bradford McIntyre.

Web Design by Trevor Uksik

Copyright © 2003-2017 Bradford McIntyre. All rights reserved.

DESIGNED TO CREATE HIV & AIDS AWARENESS