Safe Surf Rated Back To Home Page Family Friendly Site
About
Bradford
  HIV/AIDS
Articles
  Alternative
Therapies
  HIV/AIDS
Videos
  HIV/AIDS
Links
  HIV/AIDS
News

Introduction:
Positively Positive
- Living with HIV
  Out
About
HIV
  Resume/
Curriculum Vitae:
HIV / AIDS Involvements
  Biography   HIV/AIDS
News Archive
HIV/AIDS News Bradford McIntyre
   



Promising developments in vaccine research, development of a vaginal gel and PrEP lead to calls for a combination of biomedical and non biomedical approaches to HIV prevention policy

Monday, 18 July, 2011 (Rome, Italy) - Researchers speaking in the first plenary session of the 6th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2011) have today offered insights into current and future HIV prevention research and discussed how biomedical developments over the past two years are beginning to shape debate on the future of HIV prevention policy.

The presentations reflect the breadth of expertise among the more than 5,000 researchers, clinicians and community leaders attending the conference, which runs from 17-20 July in Rome.

"We appear to be at a watershed in terms of HIV/AIDS science," said IAS 2011 International Chair and International AIDS Society President, Elly Katabira. "It is a sign of how far the HIV/AIDS community has come in three decades that we are now beginning to discuss how to best combine traditional ways of preventing HIV such as condoms, needle exchange and testing with biomedical approaches such as a vaginal gel, early antiretroviral treatment and PrEP."

"The developments in biomedical science over the past few years are very encouraging but at the same time only reinforce the need to maintain a robust HIV/AIDS research agenda," said Stefano Vella, IAS 2011 Local Co-Chair and Research Director at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS).

The Changing Face of HIV Vaccine Research
In his plenary remarks, Gary Nabel, (United States) Director of the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) said that despite the fact that an AIDS vaccine posed an exceptional research challenge, and progress had been slow, two recent developments have renewed optimism for the prospects of a vaccine.

Firstly, though efficacy was modest, the RV144 efficacy trial conducted in Thailand provided a proof of concept that a vaccine can prevent HIV infection in humans . The fact that a vaccine can prevent infection rather than simply controlling viremia has significant implications for its potential public health impact.

Secondly, it has become clear that broadly neutralizing antibodies are made in a substantial number of HIV-1 infected subjects (10-25%). Exceptionally, broadly neutralizing antibodies have been derived from these subjects by several groups in the past year. Using structure-based rational vaccine design, Nabel and his team at the Vaccine Research Center identified a human antibody, termed VRC01, which neutralizes more than 90% of naturally circulating viruses. This antibody recognized the highly conserved CD4bs of the viral envelop required for entry.

The molecular details of how this antibody recognizes the virus have been discovered, and researchers have identified a class of antibodies with related properties. With this knowledge, it has been possible to trace how these antibodies are generated in humans. These advances provide critical insight into the design of an AIDS vaccine and open the door to new immune prevention strategies.

Nabel concluded by saying that the urgency for an effective AIDS vaccine has never been greater, and that it will become increasingly difficult to conduct efficacy trials in the future. By taking advantage of the recent scientific advances and coupling them with efficient clinical trial designs, the search for an effective AIDS vaccine can and must be accelerated.

Managing HIV Treatment in 2011
Giovanni Di Perri (Italy), from the School of Medicine, University of Turin, discussed how a number of high-standard clinical trials have put in a place a hierarchy of therapeutic solutions available today. Consequently, this has given the actual impression that no dramatic changes will take place in the near future.

  Although the currently available therapeutic guidelines indicate that the management of HIV infection would appear straightforward, Di Perri pointed out that in the real world a series of variables (often at an individual level) frequently require the adoption of non-conventional drug combinations. Variables such as tolerability and /or toxicity together with the increasing pressure on cost reduction are driving discussion around the clinical use of alternative therapeutic regimens.   

These regimes have not been fully validated by adequately sized (statistically powered) and designed clinical trials. Nevertheless, the applied knowledge of some specific pharmacologic properties of antiretrovirals - as well as a closer consideration of single patient profiles (including pharmacogenomics) -- might help to better tailor antiretroviral therapy at the individual level, an intention fully justified by the need of lifelong therapy.

The Combined Approach to Preventing HIV Infection  
Robin Shattock, (United Kingdom) , Professor of Mucosal Infection and Immunity at Imperial College in London, argued that the time is now right to consider a combination of biomedical and non-biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection.

Combinations of non-biomedical strategies aimed at individual behavioral change and community intervention to reduce HIV risk and vulnerability have been applied for nearly three decades, with differing success. These include sexually transmitted infection (STIs) diagnosis and treatment, HIV education and knowledge of HIV serostatus, condom social marketing, rights-based behavioural change, prevention of mother-to-child transmission, needle exchange, blood safety, infection control in healthcare, and legal protection for people living with HIV.

However, a number of new biomedical tools (or prevention technologies) have demonstrated variable success in randomized controlled trials (RCT) including:

·          medical male circumcision (MMC) (57%);

·          daily oral tenofovir (TDF) plus emtricitabine (FTC) used as pre-exposure prophylaxis (oral-PrEP) by HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) (iPrEX study) (44%);

·          1% tenofovir gel (microbicide) applied vaginally before and after sex by HIV-negative women as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis (CAPRISA 004 study) (39%);

·          a prime-boost HIV vaccine regimen(RV144 study) (31% effectiveness);

·          early use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) (treatment for prevention (T4P)) by an HIV-infected individual has been shown to reduced heterosexual transmission to an uninfected partner by 96% (HPTN052)

Approaches that could be studied now include focused assessment of medical male circumcision combined with microbicide gels for men's female partners. A second combination to evaluate would be T4P for the infected partner combined with antiretroviral (ARV) PrEP for the HIV-negative partner. At least 18% of sexual transmissions in the HPTN052 trial may have been acquired from partners outside the primary relationship. Thus the offer of ARV PrEP for the HIV-negative partner together with T4P for the infected partner may provide a more cost-effective option per infection averted.

ENDS

Online Coverage of IAS 2011 at www.ias2011.org

The online Programme-at-a-Glance, available through the website, includes links to abstracts, as well as session slides with audio and speeches (all abstract findings are embargoed until date and time of delivery at the conference). Additional online programming is provided by IAS 2011’s two official online partners: Clinical Care Options and NAM. Reporters and others can also follow key developments on the IAS 2011 blog at http://blog.ias2011.org or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ias2011.

About the IAS 2011 Organizers
IAS: The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, which is currently being held in Rome, Italy.

www.iasociety.org | www.facebook.com/iasociety | Follow us on Twitter @iasociety

ISS: The Istituto Superiore di SanitÓ (ISS) is the leading technical and scientific body of the Italian National Health Service. Its activities include research, clinical trials, and control and training in public health. It also serves as a major national clearing-house for technical and scientific information on public health issues. Among other things, the Institute conducts scientific research in a wide variety of fields, from cutting-edge molecular and genetic research, to population-based studies of risk factors for disease and disability, to Global Health research.

Onsite Media Centre Landline No. +39 0680241 756*
*For international calls to Italy, please note that the preliminary 0 in the area codes of land lines must be included

 

 

 

Name

Email

Mobile

International media:

Lindsey Rodger

Michael Kessler

 

lindsey.rodger@iasociety.org

mkessler@ya.com

 

 

+39 348 686 8417

Italian media:

Andrea Tomasini

 

tomasini39@hotmail.com

 

+39 329 263 4619

"Reproduced with permission - International AIDS Society"

International AIDS Society
www.iasociety.org



Prevenzione di combinazione Gli sviluppi incoraggianti nella ricerca di un vaccino, di un gel vaginale e della PrEP sostengono la combinazione di approcci biomedici e non alle politiche di prevenzione dell'HIV

Lunedý 18 Luglio 2011 (Roma, Italia) - I ricercatori della prima sessione plenaria della Sesta Conferenza IAS sulla Patogenesi, il Trattamento e la Prevenzione dell'HIV, (IAS 2011) hanno offerto oggi uno spaccato della ricerca attuale e futura sull'HIV e hanno sottolineato il modo con cui gli sviluppi biomedici degli ultimi due anni stanno cominciando a dar forma alle strategie per le future politiche di prevenzione dell'HIV.

Le presentazioni riflettono l'ampiezza delle conoscenze degli oltre 5.000 tra ricercatori, clinici e e attivisti che prendono parte alla conferenza inaugurata ieri e che si chiuderÓ il prossimo mercoledý qui a Roma.

"In termini scientifici oggi stiamo attraversando uno spartiacque nella lotta contro l'HIV/AIDS - ha dichiarato il Presidente di IAS 2011 e Presidente dell'International AIDS Society, Elly Katabira. "Il fatto che stiamo iniziando a discutere su come meglio combinare le tradizionali forme di prevenzione dell'HIV - come i preservativi, lo scambio di siringhe e le politiche di test - con i pi¨ recenti approcci biomedici quali il gel vaginale, la terapia antiretrovirale precoce e la PrEP Ŕ un segno di quanti progressi siano stati fatti in tre decenni dalla comunitÓ scientifica che studia l'HIV/AIDS".

"Gli sviluppi e i successi conseguiti dalle discipline biomediche degli ultimi anni sono molto incoraggianti, ma allo stesso tempo non fanno che confermare il bisogno di mantenere un consistente impegno di ricerca per quanto riguarda l'HIV/AIDS", ha dichiarato Stefano Vella, il Co-presidente locale della IAS 2011 e direttore del dipartimento del farmaco all' Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS).

Le svolte nella Ricerca di un vaccino per l'HIV
Nel suo intervento nel corso della sessione plenaria, Gary Nabel, Direttore del Centro di Ricerca sui vaccini presso l'Istituto Nazionale di Allergologia e Malattie Infettive (NIAID) ha dichiarato che, nonostante il vaccino per l'AIDS abbia posto una sfida eccezionale alla ricerca e che i progressi sia stati lenti, due recenti dati hanno ridato ottimismo alla prospettiva di mettere a punto un vaccino.

Innanzitutto, nonostante l'efficacia stia stata modesta, la sperimentazione dell'RV144 condotta in Tailandia ha fornito una "prova concettuale" del fatto che un vaccino possa prevenire l'infezione HIV nell'uomo: il fatto che un vaccino possa prevenire l'infezione piuttosto che semplicemente controllare la viremia ha implicazioni significative, in virt¨ del suo potenziale impatto in termini di salute pubblica.

In secondo luogo, Ŕ stato appurato che numero consistente di individui con HIV (10-25%) produce anticorpi con in grado di neutralizzare il virus. Nel corso dell'ultimo anno, da diversi gruppi di ricerca sono stati messi a punto anticorpi altamente neutralizzanti facendoli derivare da quelli prelevati da questi soggetti. Utilizzando particolari strategie di progettazione razionale di un vaccino basato sulla struttura di questi anticorpi, Nabel e il suo gruppo di ricerca al Centro di ricerca sui vaccini hanno identificato un anticorpo umano, denominato VRC01, che neutralizza pi¨ del 90% dei ceppi virali esistenti in natura. Questo anticorpo riconosceva i CD4bs dell'envelop virale necessario per l'entrata del virus nella cellula

I dettagli a livello molecolare sulle modalitÓ con cui questo anticorpo riconosce il virus sono stati scoperti e i ricercatori hanno identificato una classe di anticorpi con le proprietÓ ad esse correlate. Acquisito questo dato, Ŕ stato possibile comprendere come questi anticorpi vengono generati negli umani. Questi progressi forniscono una conoscenza estremamente importante per la progettazione di un vaccino contro l'AIDS e aprono le porte a una nuova strategia di prevenzione per il sistema immunitario.

Nabel ha concluso affermando che la necessitÓ di trovare un efficace vaccino per l'AIDS non Ŕ mai stata pi¨ urgente e che diventerÓ sempre pi¨ difficile condurre sperimentazioni sull'efficacia in futuro. Traendo vantaggio dai pi¨ recenti progressi scientifici e abbinandoli agli efficaci protocolli clinici di sperimentazione, la ricerca di un vaccino efficace per l'AIDS pu˛ e deve essere accelerata.

La gestione dei Trattamenti per l'HIV
Nel suo intervento in sessione plenaria Giovanni Di Perri, direttore della Clinica di Malattie Infettive dell'Università di Torino, ha sottolineato come alcune sperimentazioni cliniche il cui esito è stato di particolare impatto abbia creato di fatto una gerarchia fra le soluzioni terapeutiche disponibili oggi, generando la sensazione che effettivamente non si dovrebbero verificare cambiamenti radicali nell'immediato futuro.

Nonostante le linee-guida terapeutiche attualmente disponibili indichino che la gestione dell'infezione da HIV dovrebbe esente da difficoltà, Di Perri ha sottolineato come nel mondo reale emergano una serie di variabili (a livello individuale) che spesso suggerisconol'adozione di combinazioni non convenzionali di farmaci.

Le variabili come la tollerabilità e/o la tossicità, insieme alla crescente pressione per la riduzione di costi, stanno orientando la discussione verso l'utilizzo clinico di regimi terapeutici alternativi.

Questi regimi non sono stati ancora completamente validati da sperimentazioni cliniche del tutto dirimenti e adeguate per potenza e durata (cioè comprovate a livello statistico). Senza dubbio, la conoscenza applicata di alcune specifiche proprietà farmacologiche degli antiretrovirali - così come una più ravvicinata considerazione dei singoli profili dei pazienti (che includono la farmacogenomica) - potrebbe aiutare a creare una terapia su misura per il singolo individuo, un'esigenza pienamente giustificata dal bisogno di una terapia la cui durata, allo stato attuale delle conoscenze è cronica, cioè coincidente con la durata della vita del paziente.

L'approccio combinato alla prevenzione dell'HIV
Robin Shattock (Regno Unito),immunologo dell'Imperial College di Londra, ha affermato che per preve ire l'infezione da HIV è giunto il tempo di considerare una combinazione di strategie, biomediche e non.

La combinazione di strategie non biomediche, orientata al cambiamento comportamentale e all'intervento nei diversi gruppi sociali per ridurre il rischio e la vulnerabilità all'HIV, è stata applicata per quasi tre decenni, con successi alterni. Queste strategie includono la diagnosi e il trattamento delle infezioni sessualmente trasmissibili (MTS), l'educazione sull'HIV e la conoscenza dello stato di sieropositività, il marketing sociale sull'utilizzo del profilattico, il cambiamento delle norme comportamentali, la prevenzione della trasmissione del virus in gravidanza, lo scambio di siringhe per evitare l'uso condiviso di aghi, la sicurezza delle trasfusioni, il controllo delle infezioni nosocomiali e la protezione legale per le persone con HIV/AIDS.
Tuttavia, un certo numero di nuovi strumenti biomedici (o tecnologie di prevenzione) ha dimostrato un successo variabile nelle sperimentazioni controllate randomizzate tra cui:

·          circoncisione maschile (57%);

·          somministrazione orale quotidiana di tenofovir (TDF) più emtricitabina (FTC) utilizzata come profilassi prima dell'esposizione (PrEP orale) da uomini HIV-negativi che hanno rapporti sessuali con altri uomini (MSM) (studio iPrEX) (44%);

·          l'utilizzo di un gel vaginale (microbicida) all'1% di tenofovir, applicato sulla vagina prima e dopo il rapporto sessuale da donne HIV-negative come profilassi topica pre-esposizione (studio CAPRISA 004) (39%);

·          un regime " prime boost " di vaccinazione per l'HIV (studio RV144) (31% d'efficacia);

·          "treatment for prevention (T4P)": il tempestivo e precoce utilizzo della terapia antiretrovirale in persone con HIV ha dimostrato una riduzione del 96% della possibilità di trasmissione eterosessuale a un partner non sieropositivo (HPTN052)

Gli approcci che possono essere studiati ora includono una valutazione focalizzata della circoncisione maschile combinata con l'utilizzo di gel microbicidi per le partner femminili. Una seconda combinazione da valutare sarebbe quella tra la T4P per i partner infetti e la PrEP antiretrovirale per i partner HIV-negativi. Almeno il 18% delle trasmissioni sessuali nella sperimentazione HPTN052 potrebbe essere avvenuto al di fuori della relazione primaria. In questo modo l'offerta della PrEP ARV per il partner HIV-negativo insieme alla T4P per il partner infetto potrebbe fornire un'opzione più efficace per evitare l'infezione.

Ultimi aggiornamenti del programma:
Alla luce delle notizie della settimana passata riguardanti i nuovi dati sull'efficacia della PrEP, la sessione MOAX01 è stata ampliata per includere le presentazioni dello studio "Partners PrEP" e dello studio "CDC TDF2", in aggiunta alle quattro presentazioni in programma relative studio "HPTN 052". Come parte di questo cambiamento, l'abstract dello studio "TDF2 (WELBC01)" è stato spostato dalla sessione Late Breaker Track C (WELBC) a questa sessione.
La sessione MOAX01, ora intitolata Il trattamento è Prevenzione: ecco la prova ,si terrà Lunedì nella Session Room 1, dalle 16:30 alle 18:00. La sessione Sfide attuali nella gestione del virus dell'HIV (MOSY02) è stata spostata nella Session Room 2.

Conferenza stampaIl trattamento è Prevenzione: ecco la prova, 15.00 (CET)

Una speciale conferenza stampa includerà oggi una tavola rotonda di ricercatori che hanno lavorato allo studio "CDC TDF2", allo studio "Partners PrEP" e allo studio "HPTN 052". Saranno raggiunti da Anthony Fauci, Direttore dell'Istituto Nazionale di Allergologia e Malattie Infettive (NIAID), da Gottfried Hirnschall, Direttore del Dipartimento per l'HIV della World Health Organization (WHO) e da Elly Katabira, Presidente dell'IAS 2011 e della International AIDS Society (IAS).

Online Coverage of IAS 2011 at www.ias2011.org

The online Programme-at-a-Glance, available through the website, includes links to abstracts, as well as session slides with audio and speeches (all abstract findings are embargoed until date and time of delivery at the conference). Additional online programming is provided by IAS 2011’s two official online partners: Clinical Care Options and NAM. Reporters and others can also follow key developments on the IAS 2011 blog at http://blog.ias2011.org or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/ias2011.

About the IAS 2011 Organizers
IAS: The International AIDS Society (IAS) is the world's leading independent association of HIV professionals, with over 16,000 members from more than 196 countries working at all levels of the global response to AIDS. Our members include researchers from all disciplines, clinicians, public health and community practitioners on the frontlines of the epidemic, as well as policy and programme planners. The IAS is the custodian of the biennial International AIDS Conference and lead organizer of the IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention, which is currently being held in Rome, Italy.

www.iasociety.org | www.facebook.com/iasociety | Follow us on Twitter @iasociety

ISS: The Istituto Superiore di SanitÓ (ISS) is the leading technical and scientific body of the Italian National Health Service. Its activities include research, clinical trials, and control and training in public health. It also serves as a major national clearing-house for technical and scientific information on public health issues. Among other things, the Institute conducts scientific research in a wide variety of fields, from cutting-edge molecular and genetic research, to population-based studies of risk factors for disease and disability, to Global Health research.

Onsite Media Centre Landline No. +39 0680241 756*
*For international calls to Italy, please note that the preliminary 0 in the area codes of land lines must be included

 

 

 

Name

Email

Mobile

International media:

Lindsey Rodger

Michael Kessler

 

lindsey.rodger@iasociety.org

mkessler@ya.com

 

 

+39 348 686 8417

Italian media:

Andrea Tomasini

 

tomasini39@hotmail.com

 

+39 329 263 4619



"Reproduced with permission - International AIDS Society"

International AIDS Society
www.iasociety.org


...positive attitudes are not simply 'moods'

Site Map

Contact Bradford McIntyre.

Web Design by Trevor Uksik

Copyright © 2003-2017 Bradford McIntyre. All rights reserved.

DESIGNED TO CREATE HIV & AIDS AWARENESS